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  • Revising Mixed Constructions

    Generally speaking, mixed constructions can be divided into three different kinds. They occur when either a dependent clause, a prepositional phrase, or an independent clause is incorrectly used as the subject of a sentence. Let's look at the independent clause first:

    1.

    Because he works eleven hours every day explains why he is always tired.

    The first part of this sentence, so Because he works every day, is a dependent clause because it does not express a complete thought. It needs another, independent clause, to give it meaning, and it should not be used as the subject of a sentence. A revised version of this sentence would look like this.

    Because he works eleven hours every day, he is always tired.

    2.

    It's also not a good idea to use a prepositional phrase, so a phrase starting with a preposition like in, by, on, after, etc., as the subject of a sentence, like in this instance:

    By enlisting in the army is a good way to see the world.

    After revision this sentence could look like this.

    By enlisting in the army, you can see the world.

    3.

    Finally, using a clause that would also work as stand-alone sentence with a subject, a verb, and its own meaning - so an independent clause - also causes sentences with a mixed construction, like here:

    She was rich made her buy much more than she needed.

    Here She was rich is the independent clause that is used as the subject of the sentence. It could be rewritten like this:

    Being rich made her buy much more than she needed.